Road Transitions…

I have written down nearly every workout I’ve taken for 43 years. Every weight lifted, every repetition performed, and every set completed has been documented in handheld spiral notebooks since I was a kid.

A pen to spiral binder is a crude form of data collection, but it’s information nonetheless. Information to be studied. Information to be drawn from. Information to be used to make future decisions in pursuit of ongoing improvement.

After all these years though, I know how much I should be squatting with on a given night, or how much weight I should load on the bar for some skull-crushers. The putting the pen to paper at this point, is about more than gathering information. Above all things, it is about ritual, and for me, it is a sacred ritual at that.

This documenting of my actions with these crude tools, helps connect me to what I’m doing — to my purpose in the gym. It’s a necessary part of the workout, and a necessary part of my spirituality. In one sense, I’m writing down my actions and storing information for later use. In another sense though, I’m taking inventory of my beliefs.

By etching these letters and numbers which have accounted for so much of my life, I am in a sense, taking sacrament at the altar. It is this dogmatic process which transcends the workout itself, taking it to a much more spiritual level. That means much more to me than the gathering of information to be used later.

Another part of that ritual, is to close one spiral binder after several months, and begin another, which I did last night. Another mile-marker along the never ending road that I’ve been on since I was 13-years old, and I will follow so long as I am alive.

I don’t know where this road is taking me, and I don’t know when it will end, but I have enjoyed, and I have found great meaning in documenting the journey…. Jhciacb

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Laboratory, Me…

Objective…

To sustain muscle that is functional, strong, flexible, not burdensome, and looks good, without garnering some of the negative consequences which are often associated with recreational bodybuilding, such as aches, pains, stiffness, and spending hours in the gym.

Good news, my previous internal thesis on this hasn’t changed in over a decade, this is just an update. This is a direction I began to head in my early 40s, and lived it pretty well for about 10 years or so,. Then, in 2011 I got a little cocky, and stepped it up.

Boot in the ass…

Through my 40s, my workouts, and physique were on autopilot. After I turned 50 and while training a couple of female bodybuilders, my ego got the better of me and I put myself on an unsustainable path – for a while. Though I did not increase my training volume (sets & reps) at all, I did increase the frequency of my strength sessions; often training for 10 or 12 consecutive days prior to taking a rest day. I also began using creatine for the first time in my 30+ years of training.

My cardio protocol during this period was basically just a hard 2-mile hill run 5 days per week, followed by (10) all-out 70-yards sprints with little rest in-between. On the weekends I would engage in longer trail runs, and distance cycling – up to 40 miles.

After 18 months of pushing hard in the gym, I was using weights on most exercises that I had not used previously – I was a gym strong as I had ever been. I attribute these gains to good note taking, consistent training, a high level of concentration during the workouts, protein augmentation, and to the use of creatine.

Though I did not weigh myself hydrostatically during this period, I’ll suggest that by the end of those 18 months, I had only gained about 2 pounds of lean body mass (muscle), despite that I experienced profound gains in strength during this period. I peaked at roughly 160 pounds, and (estimating) 11% body fat.

Hole in my boot…

Because I pushed very hard in the gym, and with the running and cycling during that 18 month period, I eventually reached a burnout period. My body was just tired – most of the time. Living in a calorie defecate, despite that was not a huge defecate, may have also contributed to the burnout. The weight room became more an altar of obligation than the sanctuary it had been for nearly 30 years. I was experiencing continual body aches which I had not previously known. I was excessively tired through the course of my workdays. I was completely out of love with the ideal of recreational bodybuilding.

I took 6 weeks off, and relaxed my diet.

Reboot…

When I restarted after my layoff, I could not fully engage again. I wondered if I was trying to force something that wasn’t there. My body was still feeling the effects of pushing too hard for too long with not enough fuel. My strength training was uninspired, and down to 2-3 days per week. I also switched my cardio from running and sprinting, to walking on a treadmill at 15% grade at for 30 minutes 6 days per week. Since I hate running, and enjoy treadmill walking, this protocol will remain ongoing – it is sustainable for me.

Before I dug in to earn my way back into sustainable shape, I decided to take one more layoff – this time for 3 weeks with intent to reframe my mind as well as body, and contemplate what I was strength training really mean to me — to my essence.  During this phase I lived off Little Caesar’s, microwave burritos, Modelo Especial, and came to the eventual conclusion that I want my workouts, and eating to be sustainable always — but I already knew that, I just needed to remind myself of who I am. Definitely gained some body fat, but with no guilt whatsoever for having done so. When enough was enough, the weight room and vegetables began calling me once again – this time with a smile.

Despite the layoff, and the relaxed eating schedule, I jumped right into training with the heaviest weights (in most movements) that I have ever used. My emphasis of increasing poundages has been more focused on my primary compound movements (denoted below as 5 sets of 5 reps). On the lighter, one-dimensional stretching, and isolation movements (denoted below by as 3 sets of 8-10 reps), I have been using challenging weights, but have refused to sacrifice form for the sake of increased weights, or additional repetitions.

I have been rotating through an 8 workout cycle, on a 4 days on, 1 day off routine. My workouts, listed below, take less than 45 minutes each. My eating has been consistent with my last peak, the only exception being that I am maintaining bare minimum calorie defecate. As previously mentioned, my cardio has been limited to treadmill walking.

These workouts have not lent themselves to any excessive fatigue, or achiness. I attribute this largely to a relaxed cardio schedule, a little more food, and reduced strength session frequency. I remain convinced that, for me, too few rest days, as well as excessive running intensity had more to do with my previous aches, and lethargy, than my strength training has.

Lastly, within the scope of these workouts, I rest only long enough between sets to stretch out the muscles being worked during a particular movement. Example: After every set of a hamstring exercise, I stretch my hamstrings for 30 seconds. I rest long enough to stretch, and stretch long enough to rest.   Again, these sessions taking less than 45 minutes.  Routines below.  Videos below routines.

Chest/Triceps #1

Incline Bench Press Free Bar 5×5

Pec-Deck Flies 3×8-10

Flat Triceps Extension 4×5

Overhead Triceps Extension 3×8-10

 

Back/Biceps #1

Wide Grip Lat-Pulldown 5×5

T-Bar/Long Bar Row 3×8-10

Bench or Machine Bench Curls 5×5

 

Shoulders/Calves #1

Overhead Shoulder Press Free Bar 5×5

Cable Lateral Raise 3×8-10

Seated Calf Raise 5×8-10

 

Legs #1

Prone Leg Curls 3×8-10

Leg Extensions 3×8-10

Smith Machine Squats 5×5

 

Chest/Triceps #2

Machine Incline Bench Press 5×5

Dumbbell Flies 3×8

Triceps Pushdown 4×5

Triceps Overhead Cable Extensions 3×8-10

 

Back/Biceps #2

Bent Barbell Rows or Cable Mid-rows (I prefer cable due to an ongoing shoulder injury unrelated to lifting. Fuck running) 5×5

1-Arm Cable Rows 3×8-10 Raised Deadlifts 3×8-10

Concentration Curls 5×5

 

Shoulders/Calves #2

Dumbbell Overhead Press 5×5

Dumbbell Later Raise 3×8-10

Standing Calf Raise 5×8-10

 

Legs #2

Leg Press 5×5 Standing

Lunges 3×10

True Squats 2×20 (moderate weight)

Chest/Triceps #1

Incline Bench Press Free Bar 5×5

Pec-Deck Flies 3×8-10

Flat Triceps Extension 4×5

Overhead Triceps Extension 3×8-10

Back/Biceps #1

Wide Grip Lat-Pulldown 5×5

T-Bar/Long Bar Row 3×8-10

Low-Back Extensions 3×8-10

Bench or Machine Bench Curls 5×5

Shoulders/Calves #1

Overhead Shoulder Press Free Bar 5×5

Cable Lateral Raise 3×8-10

Seated Calf Raise 5×8-10

Legs #1

Prone Leg Curls 3×8-10

Leg Extensions 3×8-10

Smith Machine Squats 5×5

Chest/Triceps #2

Machine Incline Bench Press 5×5

Dumbbell Flies 3×8

Triceps Pushdown 4×5

Triceps Overhead Cable Extensions 3×8-10

Back/Biceps #2

Bent Barbell Rows or Cable Mid-rows (I prefer cable due to an ongoing shoulder injury unrelated to lifting. Fuck running) 5×5

1-Arm Cable Rows 3×8-10

Raised Deadlifts 3×8-10

Concentration Curls 5×5

Shoulders/Calves #2

Dumbbell Overhead Press 5×5

Dumbbell Later Raise 3×8-10

Standing Calf Raise 5×8-10

Legs #2

Leg Press 5×5

Standing Lunges 3×10

True Squats 2×20 (moderate weight)

Where this should lead…

My goal weight is 168 pounds bodyweight at roughly 14% body fat by May 30. Through my self-experimentation and note taking through the past 12 years or so, I believe this to be sustainable, ongoing. I would like to maintain these workouts and this condition at least until my early 60s, with few modifications, and only occasional layoffs. This should not put me anywhere near a state of depravity. We shall see. Pictures to follow – maybe.

Note that the exercises have a fairly equal blend of barbells, dumbbells, machines, and cables. Despite what nonsense floats around out there, there are values in all of these, so I use them all to my advantage.

As always, if you have specific questions about exercises, their values and applications, please contact me, via this website. Be well… rc

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Please check back in 2 weeks to see what happens when I hit the “stop” button on the blender in my head.  Oh, and there’s this from The Billy Nayer Show.  Enjoy!