The Goal Of Absence…

The Ghost Goals…

A 450 lb. deadlift.

A sub 7-minute mile.

A complete marathon.

A bodybuilding competition.

Swim 50 meters underwater on a single breath.

A reverse 1 ½ half dive with a full twist in the layout position from a 3-meter springboard.

These are some of the athletic feats which have fallen into the goals category at some point in my life.  I am glad that I was able to do all of these at some point in my life, even if I can’t do any of them today.  Though I am not training or preparing for a specific athletic competition or endeavor these days, I still workout consistently and with one goal above all others.

Med Head…

When my father died of complications from Parkinson’s disease over two years ago he was taking 19 medications on a regular basis – NINETEEN MEDICATIONS.  To be fair, some of those medications were useful in staving off the symptoms of his Parkinson’s, and served to enhance his quality of life.  Others though, were prescribed to offset the unwanted effects of his primary medications.

At the time he passed my father also had a neurologist, a cardiologist, a nephrologist, a urologist, a general practitioner, and I believe one or two other physicians whom he saw on a regular basis.  I won’t suggest whether or not any of them had a personal interest in my father’s wellbeing or whether he was just a number or a daily appointment each of them.  For the last two years of his life, my father saw some combination of these physicians weekly.

I do know this; each of those physicians prescribed at least one medication to help my father deal with his Parkinson’s and its related effects as they manifested within each of those physician’s specialty.  Or, they prescribed medications to help offset the unwanted effects of medications which were prescribed by the other physicians.  I call this the cascade of fragility; the more medications my father was on, the more fragile he became over time.

What my father's medicine cabinet might have looked like...

What my father’s medicine cabinet might have looked like…

Being close to the situation I can say definitively that these physicians did not talk to one another, and that often one medication prescribed would conflict with one of the others.  Though it might have been his GP’s job to manage this process, it seems he was not that effective with this responsibility.

How many doctors talk to each other...

How many doctors talk to each other…

Because my father was on so many medications at one time, it’s hard to say whether any of them were truly beneficial or counterproductive.  In his mind though, they were simply his best chance to win each day.

Goal Revision…

The oldest client I have worked with was 92.  Though he relocated to the desert several years ago, at the time we parted ways he was on no medications, none.  My oldest client today is 90, and she takes only one medication regularly and it is benign.

There is plenty of data correlating regular exercise with a lesser need for medications as we age, despite what ailments, diseases, and symptoms we encounter.  Regular exercise is a medication in itself.  We know the benefits of regular exercise are vast, yet they go widely underappreciated, under used by a majority people, and under prescribed by physicians.   Statistically speaking, most Americans get little or no deliberate exercise.

What I hope my medicine cabinet looks like when I'm 90...

What I hope my medicine cabinet looks like when I’m 90…

While I train weekly for strength, balance, flexibility, endurance, and even to look good, as I get older those are not my primary goals.  My longest term goal is that when I do die, all that can be found in my medicine cabinet are razors, cotton swabs, and Crest For Kids – stuff tastes just like bubble gum.  Be well…  rc

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Please check back in a few weeks to see what happens when I push the STOP button on the blender in my head.  Oh, and there’s this from The GO. Enjoy!

If You’re So Inclined…

There’s no shortage of data suggesting that walking is among the most useful forms of exercise. I’ll suggest that any form of regular walking is good for physical and cognitive fitness, though some forms of walking are better than others. Essentially though, there is the treadmill or the neighborhood.

I have lived much of my adult life in small towns surrounded by beauty of varying sorts. That these places have been as hilly as they are beautiful makes them great for outdoor walking – if only I found value in outdoor walking as a form of exercise. I don’t. Though I do take several short outdoor walks with my dog each day, as a form of physical fitness, I find much more value in the treadmill. When I tell people this, I’m more often met with eye rolls and disagreements than sincere interest.

Kinesis & Energy: Moving muscles burns calories. Muscle traveled greater distances equals more calories burned. By distance, in the case of walking, I’m referring to the height the stride. A more vertical walking stride (walking uphill) uses more muscle through a more complete range of motion than a horizontal stride (walking on a flat surface).

Women carry approximately 65% of their muscle below the hips, about 55% for men. When one walks uphill or up a steep incline, male or female, they will be lifting more than 25% of their bodyweight through a fairly complete range of motion before placing it back down.

Since a stride on a flat surface is more horizontal and less vertical, it is inherently done at a faster speed than walking uphill. The impact of the foot on a flat surface is actually greater and creates more stress on the ankles, knees, and low-back when done at a faster speed.

Walking uphill or on a steep incline, a person is not able to walk nearly as fast as on a flat. The slower speed minimizes the opportunity for repetitive motion disorders which are often caused by fast, momentum driven movements. Additionally, the angle of that incline actually diffuses the impact of the foot, and subsequently the ankles, the knees, hips, and the low-back.

Note how much higher the lead foot is. The leg must be raised and placed back down...

Note how much higher the lead foot is. The leg must be raised and placed back down…

Translation: Because of its slower speed and more vertical stride, walking uphill or up a steep incline is actually a much lower impact activity than walking on a flat or downhill surface, and is also more cardio intensive. I’ll suggest though, that walking on a treadmill at a steep grade should be done without holding onto the handle. Holding on allows the individual to lean buck, diffusing the incline.

Note how low the lead foot is. Less muscle required to move it, and is aided by momentum of a faster speed...

Note how low the lead foot is. Less muscle required to move it, and is aided by momentum of a faster speed…

Recommendation: If you’re going to walk outside, and do so as a means of cardio, calorie burning or conditioning, I’ll suggest attacking the uphill sections. However, go easy and slow down on the downhill and flat sections since they have a greater impact on your body, the knees in particular. Whether you choose to walk on a treadmill or outdoors in the neighborhood, stand tall – shoulders directly over hips as much as possible, and be a heel striker with your lead foot, this will minimize stress on the knees.

This kind of walk might not burn too many calories, but it's a daily investment in my soul...

This kind of walk might not burn too many calories, but it’s a daily investment in my soul…

Walking outdoors is a great activity. Again, I do this several times per day. Being in nature and moving is a cognitive therapy which is almost unequalled. As a form of calorie burning or conditioning, I’ll suggest treadmill walking at a steep grade will serve you better. Be well… rc

Fitness trainer, Roy Cohen is available for online consulting and training.  Click here to learn more.

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Please check back in a few weeks to see what happens when I push the STOP button on the blender in my head.  Oh, and there’s this from Chris Cornell.   Enjoy!