Living Life As A Form Of Exercise…

This will be my last fitness related article for this blog. I will keep the blog active, and continue writing about the aspects of life that interest me – and those which drive me to obsession.

After many years, I have decided to leave the fitness industry due to irreconcilable differences. I will now pursue another career path though no idea what that will be. Wishing You All Peace rc

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People often shy away when they read the term, exercise. Just the thought of it evokes connotations of grunting and sweating in ways which are often inconsistent with how adults like to think of themselves. Moreover, that term is often associated with negative consequences to the human body. We all know these; tender back, achy knees, sore muscles, and so-on.

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Exercise doesn’t necessarily have to be a negative. Being strong is a good problem to have, being capable even better. Becoming these doesn’t necessarily have to take place in a gym. I can think of no scenario when a person’s body is under stress, when they might wish they were a little less strong or less capable.

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Certain exercises done in the gym are more life-skills than exercises. Conversely, certain daily actions at home or in the office, done deliberately and with applied concentration, are exercises unto themselves. One that comes to mind is a simple squat, or deep knee bend.

As an exercise, squats have earned a dubious reputation. I have known many orthopedic doctors and physical therapists who have advised patients to avoid squats altogether, citing them as a high-risk exercise for the knees and lower back.

However, I have no memory of doctor or physical therapist ever suggesting to a patient that they not use the toilet, not sit down to dinner, nor sit on the sofa to watch a TV show. The very act of those very acts though, is the act of squatting. On average, a person squats 25 times per day – even those with bad knees. To my way of thinking, this is an opportunity to become stronger.

By simply living life more deliberately, we can enhance our strength – without ever walking into a gym. As a fitness instructor, first and foremost I teach good form in exercise. Practicing good form in our everyday movements can also be a form of exercise.

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Sitting, standing, reaching, and bending – these are all motions most of us do on a daily basis. By simply slowing them down, concentrating on them, and being deliberate in our physical actions, we can make our muscles stronger – just by living life. Further, by living our physical lives deliberately and keeping momentum out of our daily movements, we reduce the risk of injury from those actions.

When we are moving, we are exercising – whether we realized this or not. All movement, whether we’re carrying lumber across the garage or laundry up a flight of stairs, is an opportunity to become stronger – by simply practicing good form in our daily actions.

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I’ll suggest that if a person apply mindfulness and thought to their daily movement, an increased awareness of their physicality, and increased confidence in their abilities will be just a few weeks away.  Be well…  rc

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Please check back in a few weeks to see what happens when I push the STOP button in my head. Oh, and there’s this from The Avetts. Enjoy!

Intentional Trainer…

Critical Mass…

It has been pointed out to me that I can be excessively critical of fitness trainers not named Roy Cohen. Maybe. I am confident though, that even the greenest trainer in the average gym knows more about the basics of strength training than a majority of the members in that gym at any given time. My criticisms more often relate to the intentions of the trainer, and his methods.

Above all things, what matters most to me when teaching strength training, are safety and efficiency. If a trainer ensures the safety of the student, and plans an efficient workout, then a positive outcome is more likely. I see this combination, of safety and efficiency, rarely when I visit box gyms.

More often what I see in other trainers are people standing over their clients, scarcely engaged, hypnotically counting, and largely forgetting the task at hand; helping establish an improved physicality for the student.

Intentions…

As a trainer who always invests in the best possible outcome to a given workout with my students, the hardest thing for me to witness in other trainers is a lack of intention. Yet this is the most obvious flaw I see in other trainers – that they would rather be anywhere else.

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There is a good foundation for the cliché that trainers become trainers because they don’t want to get a real job. I can even say that of myself to a degree. I often tell people I get to do recess for a living, but I take my recess seriously. The trainers who don’t take it seriously, make that cliché shine.

Last week I was training in a local box gym. Since I know an executive with that chain, I spoke to her in advance of my workout. She suggested I keep my eye out for a trainer I’ll refer to as Agent RubberMade. She explained that Agent RubberMade was the busiest trainer at that club, that he made good money, was highly regarded, and even trained the president of the company.

Why do I call him Agent RubberMade…? On identifying him at the gym, and watching him for several days, I had regularly seen him eating out of  little RubberMade containers which were ever-present in his hands – while with clients.

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That this trainer is highly popular does not surprise me. He is a competitive bodybuilder, is good looking, and seems to know his stuff. Sometimes I guess that’s all you need. That fact that he knows his stuff is a bonus to his clients. Even if he didn’t, he’d probably still make a good living, and be highly regarded because, good looking bodybuilder…

It’s been 5 weeks now since I’ve been keeping my eye on Agent RubberMade, and he is an adequate trainer though I don’t believe his reputation is deserved. People are certainly getting something in exchange for the time and money they are giving him, but I don’t doubt they are getting full value.

Eating during training sessions notwithstanding, I have seen Agent RubberMade display most of the common stereotypes while training his clients. Texting. Stepping away or turning his back on his client in mid-set to talk with other gym members. Being excessively enthusiastic and back-slappy to the point of annoyance. Allowing his clients to talk during an exercise. And of course the big one for me, not paying enough attention to exercise form.

All that said, his clients are still better off with Agent RubberMade than without him. Without some amount of leadership and instruction, a new gym member has few choices but to mimic the actions of others – who have mimicked others through the generations of fitness enthusiasts, and so-on.

Cash Cow…

Something you may be surprised to learn is that with most of the big chain gyms, the trainers have one job above all others – to generate revenue for the facility. This is done in two ways. One, by selling more training sessions to existing clients. The other is where the real money is made, in getting their clients to bring in new members in the form of friends, family, and coworkers.

That’s right, the criteria for a trainer keeping his job is not in being a good trainer. It’s in being a good salesman. In the corporate structure of most chain gyms, the dedicated salesperson is a job in decline. In the current era, it is the trainer who is depended on to increase revenue for the club. And that business model works.

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Two days ago I ran into an old friend who now trains for this chain of gyms which I am now a member of. He is an excellent trainer, and has been at it for much of his life. After my workout, he and I sat at his desk and caught up a bit. He discussed the sales revenue he generates for his club. In his best month working there he generated $9,000 of new business, though he averages $6,000. That’s pretty good for the club since they keep 60% of that. The trainer gets the rest, but then has to pay taxes and liability insurance out of that.

If the club employs 4-5 trainers bringing in that much new revenue, then that’s $18,000 per month in sales from the floor after the trainers are paid, walk-ins and counter sales notwithstanding. The good news for me as a member of this chain is the 75/25 rule of corporate gyms. That is, 75% of the members which pay monthly dues never uses the club, thus supporting the 25% who pay and do use the facility.

Dedicated Space…

A great irony for the consumer of paid training sessions in big box gyms, is that they are often relegated to small areas in the gym known as the trainer area. These areas often have limited strength and functional fitness equipment. They are in place to keep trainer and client free of the primary workout areas, especially during peak hours when multiple trainers and clients in the open workout area can create traffic jams.

For the cost of a years membership, you can have a "trainer area" in your own basement..

For the cost of a years membership, you can have a “trainer area” in your own basement..

Of course the irony is that the client is not only paying for his gym membership as well as expensive training sessions, but that for all of that money he is corralled into a smaller section of the gym which has less equipment to work with. Many exercises done in the trainer area are body weight exercises which could be done on a person’s living room floor.

Options Away From The Box…

With that in mind, I’ll suggest a better option for many would be to train in a private fitness studio. I don’t say that because I own one. I say it because I have a good understating of the fitness industry at both the micro and the macro level.

Most private fitness studios are not in business to increase profits each month. They are in business because they are run by, and employ people who are more likely to care, and wish to positively impact the lives of others.

I'll suggest that a client/trainer relationship in a big box gym, rarely becomes a life long friendship...

I’ll suggest that a client/trainer relationship in a big box gym, rarely becomes a life long friendship…

Hiring a trainer who will come to your home is also an option – depending on what your goals are, as well as what equipment you may have at your home. This can be a convenient, and far less expensive option than going to a chain gym.

I’m not suggesting that working with trainers in big box gyms is a bad idea. I am though, suggesting that if when one takes crowds, cost, and the trainers intentions into consideration, I would not choose a chain gym as my first option. Be well… rc

Please take a moment to scroll up and rate this.  Thank you.

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Please check back in a few weeks for Part III of this series; a look at the many exercises that make no sense whatsoever. Oh, and there’s this from the great J. Mascis. Enjoy!